Past Conservationist

Steve Nokleby, 2013 Conservationist of the Year.

steve-noklebyThe Chippewa Soil and Water Conservation District Board of Supervisors chose to pay tribute to the memory of Steve Nokleby and nominated  him as their recipient of the 2013 Conservationist of the Year Award.   Steve served on the Chippewa SWCD Board of Supervisors from 2001 to 2013.  Steve passed away in March of 2013.

Steve was previously honored as the Conservationist of the Year in 1989.  Nokleby farmed in Mandt township in Chippewa County.  At that time, Steve used ridge till to control wind and water erosion and developed a more complete resource management system. Steve was one of the first to use no-till practices in Mandt township.   He used no-till and ridge till methods to enhance resource benefits, cut his operational expenses and save time.  Steve started farming in partnership with his dad, Arnold in 1974.  In 1989, he was recognized for other conservation practices such as farmstead windbreaks, and CRP filter strips.

Steve was active in Corn Growers Association, Soybean Growers Association, Farm Bureau and Jevnaker Lutheran church, a long-time Pioneer Seed and Precision Planting Dealer.

More recently, Steve participated in the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) enrolling 250 acres of No till, Nutrient Management and Pest Management.  He also enrolled 1003.6 acres in the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) and completed enhancements such as using nitrogen stabilizers and doing plant tissue testing for nitrogen management

Nokleby FieldDuring his tenure on the Chippewa SWCD Board, Steve served as the Chippewa River Watershed Project Committee representative.  He was a strong supporter of the work done by the Chippewa  River Watershed Project and was an advocate for finding ways to positively impact water quality in his operation.  Steve recognized that certain practices in the agricultural community could be improved upon and was very willing to try new practices.  In 2010, Steve partnered with the Chippewa River Watershed Project on a Drainage Water Management Project.  His project included the installation of three inline water level control structures in field that had existing pattern tile.  The retrofits to the system allowed Nokleby to vary the depth of the drainage outlet thoughout the year to maximize production and lower and have more influence on the runoff water leaving his system and entering downstream waters.  Steve’s common sense approach to conservation, his valuable input at watershed meetings, and his cooperative nature made him valued partner of the Chippewa River Watershed Project.

We lost a true conservation friend, Steve Nokleby.   Our deepest condolences to his wife Susan, son, Adam, and daughter, Jessica.

 

 

Soil Demo Video

View Chippewa SWCD Soil Demonstration

In this demo both samples are mapped as J51A Bearden-Quam, were collected on the same day and air dried. The sample on the left was taken from a corn, soybean, sugar beet, and wheat rotation with conventional tillage including fall chisel and spring field cultivating. The sample on the right was taken from a wildlife management area that was planted back to native grasses 6 years ago.

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Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program

Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program

The Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program (MAWQCP) is a voluntary opportunity for farmers and agricultural landowners to take the lead in implementing conservation practices that protect our water. Those who implement and maintain approved farm management practices will be certified and in turn obtain regulatory certainty for a period of ten years.

Through this program, certified producers receive:

  • Regulatory certainty: certified producers are deemed to be in compliance with any new water quality rules or laws during the period of certification
  • Recognition: certified producers may use their status to promote their business as protective of water quality
  • Priority for technical assistance: producers seeking certification can obtain specially designated technical and financial assistance to implement practices that promote water quality

Through this program, the public receives:

  • Assurance that certified producers are using conservation  practices to protect Minnesota’s lakes, rivers and streams

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For a video about MAWQCP please click the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AENd95KuVyg

For more information about MAWQCP please contact Tom Warner at 320-269-2139 ext. 115 or email mda.mawqcp@state.mn.us

*Information from http://www.mda.state.mn.us/awqcprogram.aspx